Dr. Stephen Harvey

Keynote

Dr. Stephen Harvey hails from England where he completed his undergraduate and master’s degrees. He earned his Ph.D. from Oregon State University. Harvey’s research is centered on improving teaching and coaching practice with specific interest in pedagogical models and teacher/coach behavior. His research focuses on the impact of teacher/coach practice on physical activity, motivation and learning. His latest co-authored book is titled Advances in Rugby Coaching: An Holistic Approach. Harvey has been involved in enterprise activities and is co-developer of the Coach Analysis Intervention System (CAIS), a systematic observation tool that permits coaches and researchers to code their behavior both ‘live’ and from videotaped records of coaching sessions.

Prior to working in higher education, he was a physical education teacher in public schools and community college lecturer. Harvey is in his tenth year in higher education, having worked in physical education teacher education at two universities in the United Kingdom, Leeds Metropolitan and Bedfordshire. Harvey is currently secretary of the International Teaching Games for Understanding Special Interest Group Executive and serves on the editorial board of the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Journal and as an ad-hoc reviewer for numerous journals such as Quest and Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. He has a personal blog featuring pertinent topics in physical education, sport and coaching.

Visit:  http://drstephenharvey.weebly.com/.

Keynote Session: Pedagogical Models in Physical Education

Models-Based Practice (MBP; Metzler, 2011) has been suggested as a means of overcoming limitations of traditional physical education (PE) curricula (Kirk, 2013), which has been chastised for being ‘a mile wide and an inch deep’. Kirk’s main justification for a move to MBP is based on its educational value, affirming the notion that PE has the potential to contribute to a wide range of beneficial outcomes across an array of domains. While the traditional ‘one-size fits all’ multi-activity curriculum model is narrowly focused on physical-education-as-sports-techniques (Kirk, 2010), the benefit of a models-based approach is that there are a range of eight models that each have a combination of foundations, teaching and learning features, and implementation needs that make them distinctive.

Moreover, each model places an emphasis on meeting certain learning outcomes, aligning these to the teaching styles, strategies and skills needed to help students achieve these outcomes through the subject matter. The purpose of this presentation is to present a rationale for a models-based approach as a continued way forward for the sustainability of PE. After providing an overview of the concept of, and overarching framework for, a models-based approach to PE, the Tactical Games pedagogical model will be explained. Overviewing this model will provide a basis for understanding two additional models, which will be covered during the two practical workshops. The presentation will conclude with sharing some of the key advantages of moving to a models-based approach as well as some suggestions for practitioners in getting started with a model-based approach in their local teaching contexts.

Moreover, each model places an emphasis on meeting certain learning outcomes, aligning these to the teaching styles, strategies and skills needed to help students achieve these outcomes through the subject matter. The purpose of this presentation is to present a rationale for a models-based approach as a continued way forward for the sustainability of PE. After providing an overview of the concept of, and overarching framework for, a models-based approach to PE, the Tactical Games pedagogical model will be explained. Overviewing this model will provide a basis for understanding two additional models, which will be covered during the two practical workshops. The presentation will conclude with sharing some of the key advantages of moving to a models-based approach as well as some suggestions for practitioners in getting started with a model-based approach in their local teaching contexts.

Activity-Based Session: Using the Inquiry-Based Pedagogical Model in Physical Education

This session will provide a practical demonstration of the inquiry-based pedagogical model. Participants will be practically involved in a soccer activity which will demonstrate how they can use the four major phases of the inquiry-based model: a) problematization; b) making hypothesis; c) testing and investigation; d) demonstration and conclusion. At the heart of this session will be the demonstration of the ‘big idea’ of the inquiry-based model; ‘think and move’. Moreover, effective questioning strategies will also be presented. Finally, participants will be engaged in discussion in the efficacy of using the inquiry-based pedagogical model in their local contexts, highlighting potential challenges they may face so that potential suggestions and/or contextual modifications to the models can be offered in order that participants may overcome these and still maintain the fidelity of model delivery.

Activity-Based Session: Using the Cooperative Learning Pedagogical Model in Physical Education

This session will provide a practical demonstration of the cooperative learning pedagogical model. Participants will be practically involved in a gymnastics activity which will demonstrate how they can use the five key features of the cooperative learning model: a) positive interdependence; b) accountability; c) face-to-face interaction; d) group processing; and, e) interpersonal and small-group skills. At the heart of this session will be the demonstration of the ‘big idea’ of the cooperative learning model; ‘the group has not achieved until all its members have achieved’ through one of the cooperative learning task structures. Moreover, effective facilitation strategies will also be presented. Finally, participants will be engaged in discussion in the efficacy of using the cooperative learning pedagogical model in their local contexts, highlighting potential challenges they may face so that potential suggestions and/or contextual modifications to the models can be offered in order that participants may overcome these and still maintain the fidelity of model delivery.